UConn 360: The UConn Podcast
The ’Black Superwoman’ Dilemma

The ’Black Superwoman’ Dilemma

July 27, 2022

In this episode, Dr. Loneke Blackman Carr discusses the multiple caregiver role experienced by many Black women. She describes this as "The Black Superwoman Phenomenon,” which essentially means they keep their families and communities afloat, but to the detriment of their own health.  Her research is the first study to examne this role specifically in the context of a weight loss intervention. We also talk about the culture around weight loss more broadly, and how it fits into our evolving understanding of holistic health and body positivity. Then, in the latest installment of the History Shelf, Tom and Julie discuss the origin of a singles club strictly for UConn employees. 

Folks, We Are 100

Folks, We Are 100

June 29, 2022

It's been a little over four years since UConn 360's humble origins in a conference room on North Eagleville Road, and now we have 100 episodes under our award-winning belts. Join us for a star-studded celebration that includes such beloved characters from the UConn 360 Cinematic Universe as co-founder Ken Best, who tells us about an exhibit he's working on that will be on display in Homer Babbidge Library; former student worker extraordinaire Maxine Philavong '20, who fills us in on her life in the Big Apple and delivers the stunning news that UConn 360 was actually helpful in pursuing a post-graduation career; and Steve Winchell '08, podcaster, artist, all-around great guy, and UConn 360 super fan, who offers some sure-to-be provocative thoughts on which dorms on campus are the best. 

 

Online archive of Ken's WHUS radio show "Good Music": https://spinitron.com/WHUS/show/6021/Good-Music

 

Maxine's podcasting work: https://www.trainerroad.com/blog/author/maxine/

 

Steve Winchell on Twitter: @SAWinchell 

 

What’s in Your Medicine Cabinet?

What’s in Your Medicine Cabinet?

June 15, 2022

Many people probably think they know exactly what's in the dietary supplements and even prescription medications they take. Many people are WRONG. Professor C. Michael White, head of the Department of Pharmacy Practice, drops by to tell us about flaws in the FDA oversight process when it comes to medications, counterfeit drugs, and how dietary supplements can pose real risks to people. And, in this installment of Tom's History Corner Cabinet, Tom and Julie unearth a letter from an alumna that details what it was like to play basketball in cumbersome bloomers.

 

Some of Professor White's articles and commentary can be found here: C. Michael White – The Conversation

Park Week

Park Week

June 1, 2022

Hartford native Frederick Law Olmsted is famous for his work in designing Central Park, but he was also a driving force behind human-shaped landscapes from Niagara Falls State Park to Smith College to the Institute of Living. Sohyun Park, assistant professor in the Department of Plant Science and Landscape Architecture in the College of Agriculture, Health and Natural Resources, recently cohosted a symposium on Olmsted as part of a year-long celebration of the 200th anniversary of his birth. Park tells us about the lessons Olmsted's work holds for landscape architects today, from public accessibility to social justice. 

 

Tom and Julie also spend some time pondering the difference between AM and FM, and Tom makes a rash promise to file a public records request. 

Pursuing History, from Israel to Eastern Connecticut

Pursuing History, from Israel to Eastern Connecticut

May 18, 2022

Stuart Miller, a professor of Hebrew, History, and Judaic Studies and Academic Director of the Center for Judaic Studies and Contemporary Jewish Life, has been a force at UConn since 1982. Professor Miller is an expert in the history and literature of the Jews of Roman and Late Antique Palestine and throughout his career has worked closely with archaeologists, having served for many years on the staff of the Sepphoris Regional Project in Israel. Now, as he prepares to retire, we get a chance to talk with him about his remarkable career, touching on everything from the evolution of Judaic studies to the essence of the professorship to the peculiar thrill of being associated with an ancient toilet.

 

Read the article about the excavation in Chesterfield here.

Schoolhouse Showdown: The Fight(s) Over American Education

Schoolhouse Showdown: The Fight(s) Over American Education

May 4, 2022

Preston Green is a professor of educational leadership and law at the University of Connecticut and the John and Maria Neag Professor of Urban Education at the Neag School of Education. He's a nationally recognized expert on school choice, charter schools, and the complex legal landscape of American public education. He's also a great follow on Twitter, and a fun person to talk to about issues that are at the forefront of American politics. He stops by this week to talk about the Supreme Court, charter schools, the fight over school curricula, and more. And, with commencement hoving into view, Tom and Julie take a look back at the "naughty generation" of 1927. 

Master of Puppets

Master of Puppets

April 20, 2022

John Bell is an associate professor in the Department of Dramatic Arts, the director of the Ballard Institute & Museum of Puppetry, and one of the most fun guests we've ever had. He stopped by to tell us about the astonishing diversity of puppeteering traditions, the everyday objects that serve as puppets without being thought of that way, and even why some people are creeped out by puppets. He also fills us in on some great opportunities to watch live performances on campus by the world-famous Bread and Puppet Theater in April.

Blue and White, Blue and Yellow: A UConn Student Responds to the Invasion of Ukraine

Blue and White, Blue and Yellow: A UConn Student Responds to the Invasion of Ukraine

April 6, 2022

This week we return to the fabled UConn 360 Studio for a talk with Victoria Kostour '22, a first-generation Ukrainian-American and the president of the Ukrainian Student Association. She tells us what it's been like to watch the war in Ukraine from here in the United States, how she and her fellow students have responded with activism and organizing, and how the UConn community has supported her. We also find a very old copy of the Daily Campus, which helps us learn about a bygone campus protest and a mysterious restaurant with a gruesome name.

Facing Anti-Asian Hate in and out of Academia

Facing Anti-Asian Hate in and out of Academia

March 23, 2022

This week we're joined by Jason Oliver Chang, Associate Professor of History and Asian American Studies, to talk about the pop-up course on anti-Asian racism he helped create for UConn; the increase in anti-Asian racist incidents and attacks since the start of the pandemic; and the role of scholarship in maintaining a strong democracy. We also take a stroll on Tom's History Sidewalk (real name pending) to the first visit by a foreign head of state to UConn. 

Healthy Democracy, Healthy People

Healthy Democracy, Healthy People

March 9, 2022

This week, we sit down with Tanya Rhodes Smith, director of the Nancy A. Humphreys Institute for Political Social Work in the UConn School of Social Work. She tells us about how social work is inherently political, how social workers can help make positive changes for individuals and society, and how research indicates that higher rates of voter participation correlate with better overall health in people. Also, back by semi-popular demand, we journey into the mists of UConn's past for a new installment of something we're not calling Tom's History Corner. 

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